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GuestDec 19, 2014
 #1
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happy7 Dec 19, 2014
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The lower the probability of both revealed squares being red, the fewer winners the contest will have. The probability of revealing a red square in a section is the number of red squares in the section divided by the total number of squares in the section. The probability that the both revealed squares will be red is the product of the probabilities of revealing a red square in each section.

Changing three of the non-red squares in the first section to red and leaving the second section as is will result in the probability that both revealed squares will be red being 5549=2045=4944.4%. Changing two of the non-red squares in the first section to red and changing one of the non-red squares in the second section to red will result in the probability that both revealed squares will be red being 4559=2045=4944.4%. Changing one of the non-red squares in the first section to red and changing two of the non-red squares in the second section to red will result in the probability that both revealed squares will be red being 3569=1845=25=40%. Leaving the first section as is and changing three of the non-red squares in the second section to red will result in the probability that both revealed squares will be red being 2579=144531.1%. The lowest probability of both revealed squares being red occurs when the first section is left as is and three of the non-red squares in the second section are changed to red, so this is the best option to add three red squares and still minimize the number of winners.

 Leave the first section as is and change three of the non-red squares in the second section to red.

shaniab29544 Dec 19, 2014
 #1
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happy7 Dec 19, 2014

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