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I have two objects, the cheapest I pay it 1 dollar, what is the discount at most?
 

tertre  Jul 30, 2017
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 #1
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help please

tertre  Jul 30, 2017
 #2
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The cheapest discount is 100%.

I often find places where I get the item free and they also pay me $20 to buy it.

Guest Jul 30, 2017
 #3
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its wron.g...

tertre  Jul 30, 2017
 #4
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It’s not wrong. You don’t understand because you are smoking pot, or you are just a natural space cadet.

Guest Jul 30, 2017
 #5
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But....he said, "the cheapest I pay it 1 dollar".

 

So.....if the cheapest price is 1 dollar, then it can't be at a 100% discount.

hectictar  Jul 30, 2017
edited by hectictar  Jul 30, 2017
edited by hectictar  Jul 30, 2017
 #6
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That’s true in this world, but in alternate realities, it can be anything. His question has an alternate reality to it, so an answer from an alternate reality seems apropos.

I came up with the answer without smoking any pot.  Maybe that would have helped in matching the answer to the question. 

Guest Jul 30, 2017
 #7
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it's 50%...s

tertre  Jul 30, 2017
 #8
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That’s a good answer too. But how do you know that is the discount in this world?

If you count the $20 rebate then the discount is minus 1900%

Guest Jul 30, 2017
 #9
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I'm with our guest on this one.

Your question does not make sense tetre :/

Melody  Jul 31, 2017
 #10
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Wow, this question is stirring up a prolonged controversy! I have a major issue with this problem, however.

 

1. We have no information about these objects.

 

This means that the combined price of both objects can be \($10000\) or vastly larger. The problem does not give any boundaries to their combined price whatsoever. In this example, this would result in a discount of \(99.99\%\)--not \(100\%\).

 

Something I can deduce is that the discount must be less than \(100\%\) as a \(100\% \) discount would mean that the item is free. 

 

Therefore, the maximum discount must be \(99.99\%\leq x<100\%\), or bounded between 99.99% and 100%.

 

After all of this pondering and contemplating with the current language of the problem, I still feel as if the problem is nonsensical. 

TheXSquaredFactor  Jul 31, 2017
edited by TheXSquaredFactor  Jul 31, 2017
edited by TheXSquaredFactor  Jul 31, 2017
edited by TheXSquaredFactor  Jul 31, 2017
edited by TheXSquaredFactor  Jul 31, 2017
edited by TheXSquaredFactor  Jul 31, 2017

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