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avatar+246 

Hey, so this is an old, like 2018 old, incorrectly and unanswered question. So I solved it myself. Here is the link to the old post: https://web2.0calc.com/questions/number-theory-help-divisor-arithmetic

 

Here is the question:

 

 

\(\text {The product of the proper positive integer factors of }n \text { can be written as } n^{(ax+b)/c}, \\\text {where }x\text { is the number of positive divisors }n \text {has, } \\c \text {is a positive integer, and the greatest common factor of the three integers }a, b, \text { and }c \text { is }1.\text { What is }a+b+c?\)

 

The product of the proper positive integer factors of n can be written as \(n^{(ax+b)/c}\), where x is the number of positive divisors n has, c is a positive integer, and the greatest common factor of the three integers a, b, and c is 1. What is a+b+c?

 

See below for answer.

 Oct 11, 2020
 #1
avatar+246 
+1

Recall that by pairing up divisors of n, we can show that the product of the positive integer factors of n is \(n^{x/2}\). We divide this formula by n to get the product of the proper positive integer factors of n, and we obtain \(\frac{n^\frac{x}{2}}{n} = n^{\frac{x}{2}-1} = n^\frac{x-2}{2}\). Therefore, a=1, b=-2, and c=2, so a+b+c=1.

 Oct 11, 2020

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