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Renee loves chocolates (except those that have cherries inside). She recently bought three boxes that have an assortment of flavours. The first box has 12 different chocolates, including one cherry. The second box has 10 different flavours, including one cherry. If she chooses 1 randomly from each box, what is the theoretical probability that she chooses two chocolates that she enjoys? Can you find your answer two different ways?

 May 15, 2022
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You can find your answer by multiplying the probabilities. The first box she has a \(\frac{11}{12}\) chance of liking it, and the second box she has a \(\frac{9}{10} \), chance of liking it. The theoretical probability that she chooses 2 chocolates that she enjoys is \(\frac{99}{120}=\boxed{\frac{33}{40}}\)

 May 15, 2022

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