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https://prnt.sc/pfqre3

 

thank you very much any help is appreciated 

 

Image added by melody

 Oct 7, 2019
edited by Melody  Oct 7, 2019
 #1
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Sorry blocked on my browser

 Oct 7, 2019
 #2
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Thanks melody!

CalculatorUser  Oct 7, 2019
 #3
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This is basically what the question is asking

 

 

Lets say the sun is located at the focus of the left side of the image

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So the distance between the perihelion and aphelion should be 46 + 70 = 116 million miles??

 

I haven't learned much in calculus yet this is as much as I can give you

 Oct 7, 2019
 #4
avatar+2417 
+2

2)

 

We can try to find the distance of the perihelion to the center of the ellipse.

 

116 / 2 = 58 million miles

 

58 - 46 (distance from perhelion to sun) = 12 million miles between sun and center of ellipse

 

 

 

 

Not sure about my answers never learned calculus

CalculatorUser  Oct 7, 2019
 #5
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+1

thank you both so much!!

 Oct 7, 2019
 #6
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Welcome!

CalculatorUser  Oct 7, 2019
 #7
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im sorry to trouble you i have one more question.

im not sure how to set this up 

 

"Write the equation of the elliptical orbit of Mercury, where the major axis runs horizontally. Allow a and b to be measured in millions of miles. Use the origin as the center of the ellipse."

 Oct 7, 2019
 #8
avatar+2417 
+1

Do you know how to write ellipse equations?

 

Standard form \(\frac{x^2}{a^2}+\frac{y^2}{b^2}=1\)

 

With \(a>b\).

 

The value of A I think is just the distance of the origin to the endpoint of the horizontal axis

 

The value of B is the distance from the origin to the endpoint of the vertical axis.

CalculatorUser  Oct 8, 2019
 #9
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what is my origin/center?

 Oct 9, 2019
 #10
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nvm its (0,0)

Guest Oct 9, 2019

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