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What is xED(f)*backwards E* f(x)=6 mean?

Guest Jul 4, 2017
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 #1
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What is xED(f)*backwards E* f(x)=6 mean?

 

\(xED(f)*\ni* f(x)=6\)

 

\(\ni \text{ means owns, or has member} \)

 

ref:   

https://oeis.org/wiki/List_of_LaTeX_mathematical_symbols#Relation_operators

 

 

I think this is what you are describing ??    but I don't know what it means. 

Melody  Jul 4, 2017
 #2
avatar+25855 
+1

Might be:

 

or:

 

if D stands for domain, this could mean something like:  "the set of x's belonging to the domain of the function f implies that there is an f(x) equal to 6".

Alan  Jul 4, 2017
edited by Alan  Jul 4, 2017
 #3
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Thanks Alan, but could you please expand upon the meaning of this.  Or give an example maybe.

This is just an if/then that applies to a specific function f, isn't it?     indecision

I really do not understand well at all :(

 

\(x\in D(f) \cdot \ni\cdot f(x)=6\)

Melody  Jul 4, 2017
 #4
avatar+25855 
+1

Well, I'm not sure I understand it myself!

 

The first part says x is a member of D(f), though we're not told what D(f) means. I guessed it means the Domain of a function f. 

 

The backward, upper case E, means "there exists", so I simply guessed the whole thing means: if x is the set of variables in the domain of f there exists a specific value of x such that f(x) equals 6.

 

Still doesn't make a lot of sense though!!

Alan  Jul 4, 2017
 #5
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Ok thanks Alan, that is all I got out of it too, I thought I may have missed something but I guess I didn't.

 

smiley smiley smiley

Melody  Jul 5, 2017

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