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Hi! I am working on finding limits using factoring, using a khan academy course. I am EXTREMELY confused, because they seem to magically erase numbers, and I do not know how they do so mathematically. In the below equation, I have no idea why they are able to remove the 1^2 that is in the denominator. How does this happen?

 

Here is the equation given:

 

((x-2) X (1 + sqrt(3x-5))) / 1^2 - (3x-5)

 

And it becomes:

 

((x-2) X (1 + sqrt(3x-5))) / -3(x-2)

 

To be reduced to:

(1 + sqrt(3x-5)) / -3

 

How are we able to simply get rid of the 1^2?

 Dec 16, 2020
 #1
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Something else is amiss

 

1^2 = 1   right

soooo

1 - (3x-5) = 1 -3x +5  =   -3x + 6  =  -3(x+2)   

 Dec 16, 2020
 #2
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...sorry   -3x+6    should equal  -3 (x-2)

Guest Dec 16, 2020

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