+0  
 
+2
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7
avatar+578 

Yes I have been "dead" for a while, I am back! I was learning about logarithms and on the test it threw this equation at me.

\(y=-\ln x +2\)

What on earth is LN? Or is it 1n? Why didn't my book tell me about this?

 

 

On a side note, what is the proper way to pronounce logarithm? 

 Jan 12, 2018
 #1
avatar+20217 
0

ln is the 'natural logarithm'     based on   e          LOG is the base 10 logarithm.

 Jan 12, 2018
 #2
avatar+578 
+2

okay...but what is its equation as a logarithm?

 

nevermind im dumb its log base e x

OfficialBubbleTanks  Jan 12, 2018
edited by OfficialBubbleTanks  Jan 12, 2018
 #3
avatar+20217 
0

Not sure what you are asking, but:

-y = -ln x   + 2

2+y = ln x

e^(2+y) = e^(ln x)

e^(2+y) = x  

ElectricPavlov  Jan 12, 2018
edited by ElectricPavlov  Jan 12, 2018
 #4
avatar+578 
+3

you are amazing and my book is lazy lol

 

thanks for telling me what ln is

 

also do you know what the proper way to pronounce logarithm is? i pronounce it log like in...well..log, but my friends say loge like in go,boat, whatever...

OfficialBubbleTanks  Jan 12, 2018
 #5
avatar+20217 
0

I've never heard it pronounced any other way than   log     rhymes with  'bog'   'dog'   'hog'  'cog'  'fog'    etc......

ElectricPavlov  Jan 12, 2018
 #6
avatar+107348 
+3

This is not an equation.....it's a graph of the natural log function reflected about the x axis and shifted up 2 units

 

Here's a graph of the parent function  and this one  :

 

https://www.desmos.com/calculator/0s8sewqwps

 

 

cool cool cool

 Jan 12, 2018
 #7
avatar+578 
+1

Well I wasn't really looking for a solution, I just wanted to know what LN was...thanks anyway!

OfficialBubbleTanks  Jan 15, 2018

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