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In 300 words or less, describe the historical and dramatic role of the Chorus in ancient Greek drama

 May 28, 2019
 #1
avatar+580 
+2

Honestly Im not going to do homework for you, but here is a tip on how to do that

 

Write the historical and dramatic role of the chorus in ancient greek drama IN HOW MANY WORDS YOU WANT

 

Then remove unnecessary parts or excessive words and make it more CONCISE to match it up with 300

 May 28, 2019
 #3
avatar+1177 
0

Chorus, in drama and music, those who perform vocally in a group as opposed to those who perform singly. The chorus in Classical Greek drama was a group of actors who described and commented upon the main action of a play with song, dance, and recitation. Greek tragedy had its beginnings in choral performances, in which a group of 50 men danced and sang dithyrambs—lyric hymns in praise of the god Dionysus. In the middle of the 6th century BC, the poet Thespisreputedly became the first true actor when he engaged in dialogue with the chorus leader. Choral performances continued to dominate the early plays until the time of Aeschylus (5th century BC), who added a second actor and reduced the chorus from 50 to 12 performers. Sophocles, who added a third actor, increased the chorus to 15 but reduced it to a mainly commentarial role in most of his plays (for an example of this role as shown in the play Oedipus the King, see video) . The chorus in Greek comedy numbered 24, and its function was displaced eventually by interspersed songs. The distinction between the passivity of the chorus and the activity of the actors is central to the artistry of the Greek tragedies. While the tragic protagonists act out their defiance of the limits subscribed by the gods for man, the chorus expresses the fears, hopes, and judgment of the polity, the average citizens. Their judgment is the verdict of history.

As the importance of the actors increased, the choral odes became fewer in number and tended to have less importance in the plot, until at last they became mere decorative interludes separating the acts. During the Renaissance the role of the chorus was revised. In the drama of Elizabethan England, for instance, the name chorus designated a single person, often the speaker of the prologue and epilogue, as in Christopher Marlowe’s Doctor Faustus.

The use of the group chorus has been revived in a number of modern plays, such as Eugene O’Neill’s Mourning Becomes Electra (1931) and T.S. Eliot’s M****r in the Cathedral (1935).

In music, chorus refers to the organized body of singers in opera, oratorio, cantata, and church music; to compositions sung by such bodies; to the refrain of a song, sung by a group of singers, between verses for solo voice; and, as a medieval Latin term, to the crwth (the bowed lyre of medieval Wales) and to the bagpipe. (See choir.)

In musicals, the chorus, a group of players whose song and dance routines usually reflect and enhance the development of the plot, became increasingly more prominent during the 20th century. During the late Victorian era, musical comedy was characterized by thin plot, characters, and setting, the main attraction being the song and dance routines, comedy, and a line of scantily clad chorus girls. Their performances provided an extravagant bonus at the beginnings and ends of songs or special dance numbers, and they were considered the flashy s*x symbols of the day. As musicals developed, however, more attention was given to integrating their various elements. In the mid-1920s, song and dance numbers began to stem more naturally from the plot, and the chorus danced more than it sang. The dancing itself soon developed from the lines of synchronized leg kicking of the early 1900s into highly sophisticated ballet and modern dance.

 May 28, 2019
edited by Lightning  May 28, 2019
 #4
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0

This is quite eloquent, but I think this exceeds the word count restriction. 

Guest May 29, 2019
 #5
avatar+5172 
+1

I believe you can thank the writers at Britannica.com for that.

Rom  May 30, 2019

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