We use cookies to personalise content and advertisements and to analyse access to our website. Furthermore, our partners for online advertising receive pseudonymised information about your use of our website. cookie policy and privacy policy.
 
+0  
 
0
114
6
avatar

a = b/e

b = 1 kg m-1

e = 1 kg m-2 

 

what is a? including units

 Dec 16, 2018
 #1
avatar+701 
0

I do not know if the variable m stands for meters or not. If it does, how can something be both kilograms and meters?

 

\(a = \dfrac{1 (kg) m^{-1}}{1 (kg) m^{-2}} \Rightarrow a = \dfrac{1 (kg) m^{-1}}{\dfrac{1}{1 (kg) m^{2}}}\). if we multiply the numerator and denominator \(1 (kg) m^{2}\)by , we have \(a = {1 (kg^2) m^{1}} \). You can adjust my answer according to your variables.

 

- PM

 Dec 17, 2018
edited by PartialMathematician  Dec 17, 2018
 #2
avatar+100800 
0

Note to  PM

 

a = b/e

b = 1 kg m-1

e = 1 kg m-2 

what is a? including units

 

PM, your current answer is       \(a = {1 (kg^2) m^{1}}\)  

 

It is NOT correct.   Can you work out why?

 Dec 17, 2018
 #3
avatar+701 
0

I guess you could also do this:

 

Take away kg from the numerator and denominator of \(a = \dfrac{(kg)m^{-1}}{(kg)m^{-2}}\) to become \(a = \dfrac{m^{-1}}{m^{-2}}\).

 

This equals \(a = {m^1}\) because \(m^{-1} / m^{-2} = m^{-1} \cdot m^{2} \Rightarrow m^1\).

 

- PM

PartialMathematician  Dec 17, 2018
 #4
avatar+100800 
+2

Yes that is right, the Kg cancel out leaving you just with 1metre.    laugh

 

1m^1=m

 

if you want to do it just with the indices rules you have

 

\(a=\frac{1Kg\times m^{-1}}{1Kg\times m^{-2}}\\ a=1m^{-1--2}\\ a=1m\)

Melody  Dec 17, 2018
edited by Melody  Dec 17, 2018
 #5
avatar+701 
0

Ok, I wasn't 100% sure if I was supposed to cancel out the Kg since the answer was supposed to include units. indecision

PartialMathematician  Dec 17, 2018
 #6
avatar+100800 
0

You can always cancel units. They work just like numbers, it can make difficult problems much easier.  !

Melody  Dec 17, 2018

9 Online Users

avatar