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How can you learn times tables quickly? (1 to 12)

Guest Apr 30, 2015

Best Answer 

 #1
avatar+4663 
+8

Practise it, eventually it becomes easy and you can do them all without thinking.

 

Some are really easy too.

 

1 , 2 , 5 , 10 , 9, 11. these are really easy.

 

If you didn't know, 9 times table has a pattern

 

9 , 18 , 27 , 36

 

The tens column have +1

The units column have  - 1

 

9, 18, 27, 36, 45, 54, 63, 72, 81, 90

 

 

As for 3s it gets easy if you practise and one you've perfected that the 4s are a walk in the park.+1

 

12 I just have a method but know I can do it without thinking 10+ & 2+ 

Both easy.

 

12 +10 + 2= 24

 

As long as that looks it's not once you think about it.

 

I had some trouble with 7s and a bit with 6. 

 

Because they seemed a bit odd. But 6 is just 3*2 And 7 is 6+1.

 

 

 

But like I said practise, practise, practice...

 

 

Good luck..... ...!..!

MathsGod1  Apr 30, 2015
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4+0 Answers

 #1
avatar+4663 
+8
Best Answer

Practise it, eventually it becomes easy and you can do them all without thinking.

 

Some are really easy too.

 

1 , 2 , 5 , 10 , 9, 11. these are really easy.

 

If you didn't know, 9 times table has a pattern

 

9 , 18 , 27 , 36

 

The tens column have +1

The units column have  - 1

 

9, 18, 27, 36, 45, 54, 63, 72, 81, 90

 

 

As for 3s it gets easy if you practise and one you've perfected that the 4s are a walk in the park.+1

 

12 I just have a method but know I can do it without thinking 10+ & 2+ 

Both easy.

 

12 +10 + 2= 24

 

As long as that looks it's not once you think about it.

 

I had some trouble with 7s and a bit with 6. 

 

Because they seemed a bit odd. But 6 is just 3*2 And 7 is 6+1.

 

 

 

But like I said practise, practise, practice...

 

 

Good luck..... ...!..!

MathsGod1  Apr 30, 2015
 #2
avatar+91045 
+5

I expect there are a lot of internet games that would help you.

I play a board game with my private students.     (I have many other strategies as well)

I will see if I can explain.

This is more fun and more effective for many students than just reciting tables is. 

-------------------------------------

Snake Game

 

This snakes game can be used to help students memorize basic facts of many different types.

It can be most easily used to reinforce knowledge of multiplication tables and addition facts.

The game can easily be modified to reinforce division, subtraction, roman numerals, geometric figures, angles or just about any other mathematical matching pairs.

Then again it can be just as easily be modified to non-mathematical matching games as well. 

The game is for 2 to 4 players.  2 players would be better because the players may get more practice.

 

Equipment:

1              The playing board (an A4 sheet inside a sheet protector works well.)

2              A non-permanent marking pen

3              A damp cloth  (just to rub off the pen at the end)

4              1 counter per player

5              A set of playing cards which are specific to the facts that you are reinforcing.

For multiplication reinforcement there will be 2 sets of cards numbered 1 to 12. (24 cards in total. These cards need to be shuffled before play begins.

NOTE: when I use this for tables I actually just have a 12 sided die which you can by from an educational game shop.

6              (Suggestion but I don’t use it)  One card per player with the facts on it to which the children can refer if they need to.

 

Aim

The aim of the game is for the players take turns to move their counter from ‘start’ to ‘finish’.  The first one to finish is the winner.

 

Multiplication tables reinforcement game

 

1              The actual table that the children are to practice must be chosen.

* For demonstration purposes let the table be the sixes.

2a           One of the children must use the marking pen provided to put the multiples of 6 onto the playing board.

i.e 6,12,18,24,30,36,42,48,54,60,66,72,

I get them to say the table as they write it down.  Eg     ‘6*4 is 24”

2b           Now the pen is passed to the player on his/her left and this player puts the multiples of 6 randomly onto the playing board again.  This continues until all the boxes are filled. (I don’t necessarily fill all the boxes)

 3            The next child in turn takes a card from the upturned pile.  The child then places their counter on the firsrt multiple that it equates to.

              i.e.        If they pick up an 8 so they move to the first available 48 (8*6=48). 

 Note:  No two counters can ever be on the same square.

4           The children continue taking turns until one of them reaches the finish and wins the game.

5            If the children don’t throw the last number and I want the game to continue I make them go backwards if they cannot go forward.  So they do not finish until they throw the number in the finish box.

 

This is the board :)

Melody  May 1, 2015
 #3
avatar+4663 
0

I just might just play this Melody...

MathsGod1  May 1, 2015
 #4
avatar+91045 
0

Don't you already know your tables ?

Melody  May 1, 2015

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