+0  
 
0
511
6
avatar

Okay so, I'm in math class as I type this and we're learning about exponents, both positive and negative, and I am super great at the positive, just not the negative ones. Help Me please... The problem is this: c^6/c^-7

 Apr 10, 2015

Best Answer 

 #5
avatar+99352 
+8

Basically if something is raised to a negative power then put it on the other side of the fraction line and change the negative to a positive.

If there is no fraction line to start with then draw one in and put 1 on the bottom :)

 

Here is a post that could help you more:

http://web2.0calc.com/questions/indices-especially-negative-indices

 Apr 11, 2015
 #1
avatar+17746 
+5

A negative exponent basically means that the term is in the wrong place: if it is in the numerator, put it into the denominator and make the exponent positive; if it is in the denominator, put it into the numerator and make the exponent positive.

For  c6 / c-7   --->   rewrite it as:  c6 ยท c7  =  c13.

(Since the exponent is negative and the term is in the denominator, write the term in the numerator with a positive exponent.)

 Apr 10, 2015
 #2
avatar+100 
0

What grade are u in?

 Apr 10, 2015
 #3
avatar
0

Im sure you don't need to know the grade.

 Apr 10, 2015
 #4
avatar+100 
0

Sorry, I just wanted to know if I could help. But if you are in a higher grade than me, then I probs can't. 

 Apr 10, 2015
 #5
avatar+99352 
+8
Best Answer

Basically if something is raised to a negative power then put it on the other side of the fraction line and change the negative to a positive.

If there is no fraction line to start with then draw one in and put 1 on the bottom :)

 

Here is a post that could help you more:

http://web2.0calc.com/questions/indices-especially-negative-indices

Melody Apr 11, 2015
 #6
avatar
0

\(same, bruh. \begin{pmatrix} 1\\ 2 \end{pmatrix} \begin{bmatrix} 1 && 2 \\ 3 && 4 \end{bmatrix}\)smiley

.
 Jan 14, 2016

29 Online Users

avatar
avatar
avatar