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In the expression, 5.28×10^3 , which number is the base?


A. 5


B. 10


C. 3


D. 5.28

 

 

 

 

In the expression, 5.28×10^3, which number is the exponent?

 

A. 3

B. 5

C. 5.28

D. 10

 

 

 

 

In the expression, 5.28×10^3 , which number is the coefficient?

 

A. 5

B. 10

C. 5.28

D. 3

 Sep 18, 2019
 #1
avatar+19838 
+1

The base is 10   the exponent is the '3'....and the coefficient is......

 Sep 18, 2019
 #2
avatar+1202 
+1

What was 3 ?

macabresubwoofer  Sep 18, 2019
 #3
avatar+19838 
+2

C'mon MS....what is left after you use the '3' and the '10'  ? cheeky

ElectricPavlov  Sep 18, 2019
 #4
avatar+19838 
+2

Ya know you asked a very similar question just the other day.....did you look at THOSE answers for a similar answer to this question??  cheeky

https://web2.0calc.com/questions/in-the-expression-6-24-10-3-which-number-is-the-exponent#r1

ElectricPavlov  Sep 18, 2019
 #5
avatar+1202 
+1

It's C ?

macabresubwoofer  Sep 18, 2019
 #6
avatar+19838 
+2

yes....indecision

ElectricPavlov  Sep 18, 2019
 #7
avatar+1202 
+1

Thanks man

macabresubwoofer  Sep 18, 2019
 #8
avatar
0

Number three is wrong. Technically, that is, pedantically speaking there isn’t a coefficient.

A coefficient is a numerical or constant quantity placed before and multiplying the variable in an algebraic expression.  There is no variable here, so there is no coefficient

(Oh, and it’s not a physical constant either. There is no reference to any kind of physical relation.)

 

P.S. If you need a string of curses, I can provide them for you ... in several languages.

Guest Sep 18, 2019
 #9
avatar+19838 
+1

Technically, that IS the nomenclature or definitions used for the parts of a number in scientific notation:

https://www.shmoop.com/basic-operations/scientific-notation.html

 

...and from Wikipedia:
In mathematics, a coefficient is a multiplicative factor in some term of a polynomial, a series, or any expression

 

 

So people DO understand that the 5.28 portion is known as the coefficient.   frown

ElectricPavlov  Sep 18, 2019
edited by Guest  Sep 18, 2019
 #10
avatar
0

A coefficient is a multiplicative factor in some term of a polynomial, a series, or any expression. Note that all the examples for coefficients precede variables in wikipedia.org/wiki/Coefficient,.  They are sometimes depicted in non-italicized boldfaced letters defined as constants for given equations, but they always precede variables. Note that no example is listed for use without the subsequent variable, even in the case of a series.

 

The only official exception to this is in physics, where it’s used as a constant for conversion in an equation, where it usually precedes a variable.

 

The example in shmoop.com (which sounds like a pet name for a lover) though understandable, is, in fact, arbitrary. The unshmoopified, formal and official name for this portion of the expression is mantissaSo, technically, that IS NOT the nomenclature or definitions used for the parts of a number in scientific notation:

 

Yes, shmoopy, it’s easy to understand that portion could be called a coefficient. I think it’s a great alternative name. However, this post is a pedantic, hair-splitting, mathematical definition, which does not allow for casual vocabulary.

 

...Though there is always some room for sweet-talk.   

Guest Sep 19, 2019
 #11
avatar+19838 
0

https://study.com/academy/lesson/what-is-scientific-notation-definition-rules-examples.html

 

 

 

https://www.google.com/search?q=scientific+notation+parts&tbm=isch&source=univ&client=firefox-b-1-d&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjj0cOPzuPkAhWFsJ4KHRztDKAQsAR6BAgHEAE&biw=1920&bih=916

 

 

 

 

https://www.yourdictionary.com/mantissa

ElectricPavlov  Sep 22, 2019
edited by ElectricPavlov  Sep 22, 2019

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