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We are currently discussing point slope forms and some other thing that has to do with exponential relationships, however I can't recall what it's called but it is sort of like point slope, except it is for exponential relationships (i couldn't really hear what the teacher was saying). If somebody can explain why point slope is used and what it's used for, in addition to the exponential thing. I would really really appreciate it considering the fact that I have an exam coming up as well and this will probably come up on it. :( 

Thank you so much. 




also,,,
I'm really sorry if i keep asking these questions, and I really do try to listen in class but it's just the people that sit near me are constantly making sounds, and they annoy me a lot so it gets distracting, therefore, I can't really concentrate. I have talked to my teacher about this but unfortunately she won't do anything about it. 

Edit: I am going to literally fail LOL
 

 Oct 2, 2019
edited by Nirvana  Oct 2, 2019
 #1
avatar+6045 
+2

half life?

 Oct 2, 2019
 #4
avatar+655 
+1

:'( i honestly don't know man... I could not hear an absolute word of what she was saying

Nirvana  Oct 2, 2019
 #2
avatar+104962 
+3

I don't know what you are referring to.....but.....she might have been pointing out that the  slope of  any tangent line to the function e^x   is   just  the function value itself at the point of tangency

 

That is....the slope of the tangent line  at  any  point  (a, e^a)  is just   e^a

 

See the example here  :  https://www.desmos.com/calculator/fzwjzsxk4l

 

Notice that the slope of the tangent line  at x  = 0  =   e^0  = 1   

 

 

cool cool cool

 Oct 2, 2019
 #3
avatar+655 
+1

hmm, i see...but where does that "\(e^x \)" come from.
what does e represent, does it just represent like an exponential function or something... also what kind of relationship does it have when its compared to slope point because im pretty sure slope point is just like \(y-y_1=m\left(x-x_1\right)\) if im correct. idk. 
 

Nirvana  Oct 2, 2019
 #5
avatar+104962 
+2

"e"  is the base of the natural log....it is the irrational number 2.718.....

 

 

cool cool cool.

CPhill  Oct 2, 2019
 #6
avatar+655 
0

Ah, I see :'') 

Thanks!! laugh

Nirvana  Oct 2, 2019

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