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please help me out.. i promise i'll get off this site afterwards. this problem has been stressing me out all day.. 

Guest Jun 5, 2018
edited by Guest  Jun 5, 2018
 #1
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I believe that "losing" or "playing away" would be considered independent events. By definition, "independent events" are events that have no bearing on the future events occurring. In the context of this example, the team could be playing an away game today, but tomorrow the same team could either be playing an away or home game. 

 

Upon further review, I am not a sports aficionado, so I did not consider the concept of a "home field" advantage. I had, therefore, dismissed the possibility of a dependent event. Thank you, GingerAle, for respectfully correcting me while providing a succinct explanation.  

TheXSquaredFactor  Jun 5, 2018
edited by TheXSquaredFactor  Jun 17, 2018
 #2
avatar+1187 
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Most fans of team sports are intuitively aware of the “home court” or “home field” advantage and the disadvantage for away games.  This implies the winning or losing is dependent on the home or away condition.   

 

Here is a mathematical test for dependent/independent using the chart data.   

 

\(\text {If this is independent then } \\ P(L|A)=P(L) \tiny \text{ Read as “The probability of (L)osing, given the game is (A)way = the probability of (L)osing. }\\ P(0.3|0.4) \stackrel{?}= P(0.65)\\ 0.75 \neq 0.65 \tiny \text{ These are not equal, so the events are dependent. }\\\)

A notable increase in the probability for losing the away games. 

 

 

GA

GingerAle  Jun 5, 2018

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