+0  
 
+1
183
11
avatar

ok so when the coordinate rule looks like this 
(x,y)----->(-x,y+5)

what would be the difference between the pre image and the image?

 Jun 7, 2019
 #1
avatar+8842 
+3

If you take a point and make its x-coordinate negative, that will flip the point over the y-axis.

And if you take a point and add  5  to its y-coordinate, that will shift the point up 5 units.

So the image is the pre-image flipped over the y-axis and shifted up  5  units.

 Jun 7, 2019
 #2
avatar
+3

thank you so much! but, what do you mean by flipped over? 

Guest Jun 7, 2019
 #3
avatar+8842 
+3

Another word is "reflected."

 

For example:

 

If you take  (3, 7)  and make its x-coordinate negative, you will get  (-3, 7) .

 

 

Maybe you can imagine that this graph is an open book where the y-axis is the division between two pages.

 

If you flipped the page, then the two points would meet.

 

If you took  (3, 7)  and flipped it over the y-axis (like flipping the page), you would get  (-3, 7) .

 

So  (-3, 7)  is  (3, 7)  flipped over the y-axis.

 

And you can see that the distance between  (3, 7)  and the y-axis is the same as the distance between  (-3, 7)  and the y-axis.

 

Does that kind of make sense? smiley

hectictar  Jun 7, 2019
edited by hectictar  Jun 7, 2019
 #4
avatar+1015 
+1

I like to call it the oppsite of the Number on the cordinate grid say you have (1,-1) well its oppsite is (-1,-1) 

 

or say we have (6,5) well its oppsite or as hectictar had explained how she calls it reflected is (-6,5) 

 

Also to count on a graph you just count each corrdinate across.  See because I counted it the to points are 6 corrdinates apart.....   Oh yeah thanks hectictar for your image I saved it and did that on it hope your not mad or anything XD 

 

 

~Nickolas 

cheekycheekycheeky
 

Nickolas  Jun 7, 2019
edited by Nickolas  Jun 7, 2019
 #11
avatar
+1

yes thank you! so like would lets say for example (3,7) and have that for point a and (-3,7) for A' so would the coordinate rule of that just be 
(x,y)----> (-x,y)?

Guest Jun 7, 2019
 #5
avatar+8842 
+4

Nickolas, how would you say that  (8, -5)  and  (8, 5)  are related?

 

 

What is the opposite of  (8, 5)  ?

 

cheekysmiley

 Jun 7, 2019
 #6
avatar+1015 
0

I mean (8,5) and (-8,5)

Nickolas  Jun 7, 2019
 #7
avatar+1015 
0

Was this a trick question beause I never said that???? 

Nickolas  Jun 7, 2019
 #8
avatar+1015 
0

But if you were looking for there oppsites you could flip it over the x axcis instead of the (y) axcis so instead of left or right you could flip going down 

Nickolas  Jun 7, 2019
 #9
avatar+8842 
+4

Maybe it's a trick question. I was just trying to get you to think.

 

There isn't a single defined "opposite" of  (8, 5) .

 

Instead of just saying  " (8, 5)  is the opposite of (-8, 5) "  we need to say something like

 

(8, 5)  is the opposite over the y-axis of  (-8, 5)

 

and

 

(8, 5)  is the opposite over the x-axis of  (8, -5)

 

It is important to say which axis that the point is "flipped" over. smiley

hectictar  Jun 7, 2019
 #10
avatar+1015 
0

I agree but Iguess I left that out I will remeber that... Thanks

smiley

 

~Nickolas

cheekycheekycheeky

Nickolas  Jun 7, 2019

4 Online Users