+0  
 
0
578
2
avatar

For example:

 

log 4 ≈ 0.477

log 4 ~ 0.477

 

Which statement is more correct?

 

 

Note: I believe "≈" means "Almost equal to" or "Asympotic to." The other symbol, "~" means "Approximately."

Guest Feb 14, 2017
edited by Guest  Feb 14, 2017
edited by Guest  Feb 14, 2017

Best Answer 

 #2
avatar+18628 
+10

For example:

log 4 ≈ 0.477

log 4 ~ 0.477

Which statement is more correct?

 

\(\begin{array}{|rcll|} \hline log 4 \approx 0.477 \quad \text{is correct, it means approximately } \\ \hline \end{array} \)

 

 

\( {\displaystyle \sim } \):
\({\displaystyle a\sim b} \qquad\)Equivalence relation between elements  \({\displaystyle a}\) and \({\displaystyle b}\)
\({\displaystyle a\sim b} \qquad \)\({\displaystyle a}\) is proportional to \({\displaystyle b}\)

 

 

laugh

heureka  Feb 14, 2017
Sort: 

2+0 Answers

 #1
avatar+10614 
+5

FYI from Wikipedia regarding the tilde (~)      I think most people use ~  just one, because it is available on the keyboard.

 

This symbol (in English) informally[4] means "approximately", "about", or "around", such as "~30 minutes before", meaning "approximately 30 minutes before".[5][6] It can mean "similar to",[7] including "of the same order of magnitude as",[4] such as: "x ~ y" meaning that x and y are of the same order of magnitude. Another approximation symbol is the double-tilde ≈, meaning "approximately equal to",[5][7][8] the critical difference being the subjective level of accuracy: ≈ indicates a value which can be considered functionally equivalent for a calculation within an acceptable degree of error, whereas ~ is usually used to indicate a larger, possibly significant, degree of error. The tilde is also used to indicate "equal to" or "approximately equal to" by placing it over the "=" symbol, like so: ≅.

ElectricPavlov  Feb 14, 2017
 #2
avatar+18628 
+10
Best Answer

For example:

log 4 ≈ 0.477

log 4 ~ 0.477

Which statement is more correct?

 

\(\begin{array}{|rcll|} \hline log 4 \approx 0.477 \quad \text{is correct, it means approximately } \\ \hline \end{array} \)

 

 

\( {\displaystyle \sim } \):
\({\displaystyle a\sim b} \qquad\)Equivalence relation between elements  \({\displaystyle a}\) and \({\displaystyle b}\)
\({\displaystyle a\sim b} \qquad \)\({\displaystyle a}\) is proportional to \({\displaystyle b}\)

 

 

laugh

heureka  Feb 14, 2017

7 Online Users

avatar
We use cookies to personalise content and ads, to provide social media features and to analyse our traffic. We also share information about your use of our site with our social media, advertising and analytics partners.  See details