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Solve the system of equations using the substitution method. I can't understand the 5/6x!!

 

y = 2 + 5/6 * x 4x - 3y = 3

 Dec 16, 2019
 #1
avatar+43 
0

\(\mathrm{Subsititute\:}y=2+\frac{5}{6}\cdot \:x \)

\(\begin{bmatrix}4x-3\left(2+\frac{5}{6}x\right)=3\end{bmatrix}\)

\(\mathrm{Isolate}\:x\:\mathrm{for}\:4x-3\left(2+\frac{5}{6}x\right)=3:\quad x=6\)

\(\mathrm{For\:}y=2+\frac{5}{6}\cdot \:x\)

\(\mathrm{Subsititute\:}x=6\)

\(2+\frac{5}{6}\cdot \:6=7\)

\(y=7, \text{Solution is x=6, y=7}\)

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 Dec 16, 2019
 #2
avatar+19806 
0

y = 2 + 20/6 x - 3y    add 3 y to both sides of the equation

4y = 2 + (20/6) x        your original Q says y = 3    substitute that in

12 = 2 + 20/6 x       subtract 2 from both sides

10 = 20/6   x            multiply both sides by 6/20

60/20 = x = 3

 

 

Now I see your question has TWO Equations....please put some spaces in there !

y = 2 + 5/6 * x

4x - 3y = 3          Is much more clear.....see whoisjoe answer below....

 Dec 16, 2019
edited by ElectricPavlov  Dec 16, 2019
 #4
avatar+43 
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Hmm. We seem to be disagreeing. I think you forgot that y = 2 + 5/6x is a different term than 4x-3y=3, lol. Guest probably should have put something to tell us that they are 2 different terms, unless I am the mistaken one. Oh I see you didn't see that it was a system of equations so you just solved for x!

whoisjoe  Dec 16, 2019
edited by whoisjoe  Dec 16, 2019
 #3
avatar+43 
-1

As for the 5/6x confusion you are having, just put the 5/6x in the term you are substituting in for "y", like I did when I said \(\mathrm{Subsititute\:}y=2+\frac{5}{6}\cdot \:x\)

.
 Dec 16, 2019

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