We use cookies to personalise content and advertisements and to analyse access to our website. Furthermore, our partners for online advertising receive pseudonymised information about your use of our website. cookie policy and privacy policy.
 
+0  
 
0
88
10
avatar+655 

relative/local and absolute/global Maxima and minimas? 

i'm so confused and I have a test in two days and idjskladjlks :( 

If someone can explain the difference between these two, I would really really really really appreciate it...


thank you so much <3 

 Oct 8, 2019
 #1
avatar+105683 
+2

The local ones are the ones confined to a given domain. I mean the max and min between given x values

 

The global ones are for the whole graph with no restrictions.

 Oct 8, 2019
 #2
avatar+655 
+1

what do you mean by entire graph with no restrictions....i thought there were some restricitons
 

Nirvana  Oct 8, 2019
 #3
avatar
+3

ok 

Consider the graph of y=x^2

 

the global max is infinity and the global min is 0

---------------

Now consider the domain \(1\le x\le4\)

For this given domain, the local maximum is  4^2=16  and the local minimum is  1^1=1

 

Does that make more sense?

 

 Oct 8, 2019
 #4
avatar+655 
0


thank you so much melody! <3
but
kind of...

i'm still sort of confused :')


so let me ask you this.... 
how do you know if its global? i've heard somethings about the neighborhood around the point and there being other lines around it or something like that but im not really sure what that is about? 

Nirvana  Oct 8, 2019
edited by Nirvana  Oct 8, 2019
 #5
avatar+104969 
+2

A global max or min usually refers to an absolute max or min of a function

 

A local max or min usually occurs on some specified finite  interval

 

Note that  these could be the same, in some cases

 

For instance.....for the function  y  = x^2, the absolute (or global )  min occurs at x  = 0

 

However.....if we specify the min on the interval from  x = -1 to x = 1......we are talking about a local min.....this is still at x  = 0.....so the absolute min and local min are the same in this case.....

 

 

cool cool cool

CPhill  Oct 8, 2019
 #6
avatar+655 
+1

ohhhhhhh


oh my god 


thank you so much 

both of you

thank you Melody and thank you so much CPhill! crying <3 you both are amazing omg thank you so much

Nirvana  Oct 8, 2019
 #7
avatar+655 
+1

so to clarify,,,
when they don't mention a specific interval its global or absolute but when they do it's local or relative?

Nirvana  Oct 8, 2019
 #8
avatar+105683 
+2

Yes that sounds resonable but of course sometimes an interval will include the absolute/global max (or min) and if that is the case then the local max (or min) is also the global one.

Melody  Oct 8, 2019
 #9
avatar+105683 
+2

That sounds a bit like you are looking at the gradient of the curve at a specific point but that has little to do with global/local  minimum/maximum.

 

 

If you know enough about the shapes of graphs (or you know some calculus) then you can often know if a point is really a global maximum or minimum. Otherwise you can only know it is a local one.

Melody  Oct 8, 2019
edited by Melody  Oct 9, 2019
 #10
avatar+655 
+1

Ah,,, i see thanks melody :)

Nirvana  Oct 9, 2019

19 Online Users

avatar