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1.4+1/3+2/20=

Guest Dec 14, 2014

Best Answer 

 #4
avatar+93691 
+8

Hi Anon,

I teach little kids these concepts on a 1 to 1 basis and I have extremely good results.

What Geno has done is absolutely correct (and maybe your daughter can handle an explanation like that) but it is not really aimed at helping a ten year old to understand the concepts involved.  

 

My favourite tool when I teach ten-year-olds fraction concepts is an empty egg carton and some lego blocks.

The carton is the whole.  Get your daughter to put blocks in a quarter, a half, a third, a sixth, 5 twelths etc.

Then start using the carton to work out some addition problems.  (use different coloured blocks to help with addition)  You can show on paper what you are doing with the carton. But the initial emphasis should be with the visual hands on carton and blocks. 

Take it easy, your daughter is little.  She will learn much better if you give her time to process her 'play'.  

 

There are a lot of concepts involved in the problem you have presented.  You also need to see if she understands how to turn decimals into fractions.

If this is homework and she is at a level where she can understand with just minimal 'leading' by you then that is great.

If not then don't push it.  Spend time on developing the understanding of the concepts.  It will make math fun and it will lead to a much fuller understanding in the long term. 

 

It is extremely important that primary children develope the concept of numbers and how they fit together. 

 

Good luck to both of you :)))

Melody  Dec 15, 2014
 #1
avatar
0

1.833333333333333

Guest Dec 14, 2014
 #2
avatar
0

my fault. I should have said ,I know. I know the result, the doudt is how to get there? I'm suposed to help my 10 years old daughter resolving it for school. coulkd you show a way to help her understand it?

Guest Dec 14, 2014
 #3
avatar+17745 
+5

If you want to use common fractions:

1.4  =  1 + 4/10  =  14/10

2/20  =  1/10            (reduce the fraction by dividing both the numerator and denominator by 2)

14/10 + 1/3 + 1/10

The common denominator is  10 x 3  =  30:

14/10 x 3/3  =  42/30

1/3 x 10/10  =  10/30

1/10 x 3/3  =  3/30

14/10 + 1/3 + 1/10  =  42/30 + 10/30 + 3/30  =  [42 + 10 + 3] / 30  =  55/30  =  11/6

If you want to use decimal fractions:

1.4 + 1/3 + 2/20  =  1.4 + 0.33333... + 0.1  =  1.8333...

geno3141  Dec 14, 2014
 #4
avatar+93691 
+8
Best Answer

Hi Anon,

I teach little kids these concepts on a 1 to 1 basis and I have extremely good results.

What Geno has done is absolutely correct (and maybe your daughter can handle an explanation like that) but it is not really aimed at helping a ten year old to understand the concepts involved.  

 

My favourite tool when I teach ten-year-olds fraction concepts is an empty egg carton and some lego blocks.

The carton is the whole.  Get your daughter to put blocks in a quarter, a half, a third, a sixth, 5 twelths etc.

Then start using the carton to work out some addition problems.  (use different coloured blocks to help with addition)  You can show on paper what you are doing with the carton. But the initial emphasis should be with the visual hands on carton and blocks. 

Take it easy, your daughter is little.  She will learn much better if you give her time to process her 'play'.  

 

There are a lot of concepts involved in the problem you have presented.  You also need to see if she understands how to turn decimals into fractions.

If this is homework and she is at a level where she can understand with just minimal 'leading' by you then that is great.

If not then don't push it.  Spend time on developing the understanding of the concepts.  It will make math fun and it will lead to a much fuller understanding in the long term. 

 

It is extremely important that primary children develope the concept of numbers and how they fit together. 

 

Good luck to both of you :)))

Melody  Dec 15, 2014

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