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There are people who think the earth is flat and that the sun orbits the earth at 3000 miles. If the sun is over the equator and I'm 2000 miles, at what angle would I see the sun?

 

The adjacent would be 2000, the opposite 3000. so it would be, o/a, then use the inverse of tan. Is this correct?

 

If so, I can use this procedure for any distance value for the adjacent?

 Jun 13, 2017
edited by Guest  Jun 13, 2017
edited by Guest  Jun 13, 2017
edited by Guest  Jun 13, 2017
edited by Guest  Jun 13, 2017
edited by Guest  Jun 15, 2017
 #1
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+1

 

Actually, because of  the Earth's curvature - and other factors - the procedure is a little more complicated. 

 

You can read about it here :  

 

http://www.pveducation.org/pvcdrom/properties-of-sunlight/elevation-angle

 

 

cool cool cool

 Jun 13, 2017
 #2
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+2

Hey CPhill...thanks for the reply!

 

But the premise is that the earth is flat. Could u respond from that angle, pun intented...:)

Guest Jun 13, 2017
 #3
avatar+98130 
+2

HAHAHA!!.....yeah...if you're amongst the "Flat Earthers"....then your procedure is "valid"....

 

 

 

cool cool cool

 Jun 13, 2017
 #4
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+1

No, flat earth theory makes no sense...:)...and thank you! I think one of the things that makes no sense is one person in particular thinks that a sun orbiting over a flat earth at 3000 miles, fits the current path of the sun with a sunrise and sunset and all.

Guest Jun 13, 2017
edited by Guest  Jun 13, 2017
 #5
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+1

To finish my equation:

3000/2000 = 1.5, using the inverse of tan = 56.3°

Guest Jun 13, 2017

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