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how do you rewrite expressions into simpler form?

Guest May 2, 2014

Best Answer 

 #1
avatar+5454 
+14

how do you rewrite expressions into simpler form?

 

You can:

- combine like terms (by

- multiply out any constants and variables (use the Distributive Property)

 

and with polynomials: 

-factoring / polynomial long division

 

and with radicals:

- rationalizing the denominator

 

If you have any specific example, I can explain:)

kitty<3  May 2, 2014
 #1
avatar+5454 
+14
Best Answer

how do you rewrite expressions into simpler form?

 

You can:

- combine like terms (by

- multiply out any constants and variables (use the Distributive Property)

 

and with polynomials: 

-factoring / polynomial long division

 

and with radicals:

- rationalizing the denominator

 

If you have any specific example, I can explain:)

kitty<3  May 2, 2014
 #2
avatar+92623 
0

Hi Kitty,

I like most of your answer but factorising is the opposite of simplifying. Opposite is not really the correct word but I think you will understand what i mean. 

Simplify

$$(x+3)(x-2)=x^2+x-6$$

factorise

$$x^2+x-6=(x+3)(x-2)$$

Melody  May 2, 2014
 #3
avatar+26716 
0

Hmm! It's a moot point which is the simpler of your two equations Melody.  Here's what the computer algebra system built into Mathcad thinks:

simplify

It should be noted that there isn't a mathematical definition of "simplify" or "simpler" and computer algebra systems often produce "simplified" expressions that don't match our human expectations.  Also, people often differ on what is simpler! 

Alan  May 2, 2014
 #4
avatar+92623 
0

okay Alan,  I guess there is the right way and the Australian (NSW) way and the two don't always converge.  

Melody  May 2, 2014
 #5
avatar+86859 
0

It must be a matter of semantics.....in the US , we call this

(x+2) (x-1)  = x2 + x - 2

"expanding" or an "expansion"

This

x2 + x - 2  = (x+2) (x-1)

is called "factoring" an expression

 

You say, "to-ma-to,"   I say, "to-mah-to"

CPhill  May 2, 2014
 #6
avatar+330 
0

 

Here is a unique view of semantics Expression(s)

www.youtube.com/watch?v=LOILZ_D3aRg#t=36

~~D~~

DavidQD  May 2, 2014

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