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 Nov 24, 2020

Best Answer 

 #3
avatar+34 
+2

Sure, I can try! First, we can call the side length of the square "x". The area of this orginal square would be x^2. Next, if the length of the side of the square was doubled, then one side would have a length of 2*x = 2x. The area of this new sqaure would be (2x)^2 = 4x^2. Therefore, the ratio of the areas of the original sqaure and the area of the new sqaure is x^2 / 4x^2 = 1/4, or 1:4. I hope that helped! laugh

 Nov 24, 2020
edited by Ziggy  Nov 24, 2020
edited by Ziggy  Nov 24, 2020
 #1
avatar
+1

Original square =1^2 =1

2nd square         =2^2 =4

 

Ratio =1:4

 Nov 24, 2020
 #2
avatar+205 
+1

Can you do it in an algebraic way?

 Nov 24, 2020
 #3
avatar+34 
+2
Best Answer

Sure, I can try! First, we can call the side length of the square "x". The area of this orginal square would be x^2. Next, if the length of the side of the square was doubled, then one side would have a length of 2*x = 2x. The area of this new sqaure would be (2x)^2 = 4x^2. Therefore, the ratio of the areas of the original sqaure and the area of the new sqaure is x^2 / 4x^2 = 1/4, or 1:4. I hope that helped! laugh

Ziggy  Nov 24, 2020
edited by Ziggy  Nov 24, 2020
edited by Ziggy  Nov 24, 2020

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