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In physics, Ohm's law says that current through a wire, I, is directly proportional to voltage, V, and inversely proportional to resistance, R:
I = V/R
It's also true that resistance is directly proportional to the length of the wire.  We have a piece of wire.  We pass 60 volts through this wire and measure 200 milliamps of current.  If I cut the wire in half and pass 400 volts through it, how many milliamps of current will I measure?

 Jul 28, 2023
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First scenario: Voltage (V1) = 60 volts, Current (I1) = 200 milliamps.
Second scenario: Voltage (V2) = 400 volts, Current (I2) = ? (what we need to find).

Ohm's law states:

I = V / R

Since the resistance is directly proportional to the length of the wire, we can express it as:

R ∝ L

Where R is resistance and L is the length of the wire.

Let's assume that the initial length of the wire is L1, and when it's cut in half, the new length is L2 = L1/2.

Now, let's consider the first scenario:

V1 = 60 volts
I1 = 200 milliamps

Using Ohm's law:

I1 = V1 / R1

Now, for the second scenario:

V2 = 400 volts
I2 = ? (what we need to find)

Using Ohm's law again:

I2 = V2 / R2

Since resistance is directly proportional to length, we can express the relationship between R1 and R2 as:

R2 = k * L2

where k is a constant of proportionality.

Since the wire is the same material, the constant k will be the same for both scenarios. Therefore, we can write:

R1 = k * L1
R2 = k * (L1/2)

Now, to find the ratio of I2/I1, we can divide the equation for I2 by the equation for I1:

(I2 / I1) = (V2 / R2) / (V1 / R1)

(I2 / I1) = (V2 * R1) / (V1 * R2)

Substitute the expressions for R1 and R2:

(I2 / I1) = (V2 * (k * L1)) / (V1 * (k * (L1/2)))

(I2 / I1) = (V2 * L1) / (2 * V1)

Now, plug in the values:

(I2 / 200 milliamps) = (400 volts * L1) / (2 * 60 volts)

(I2 / 200) = (400 * L1) / 120

(I2 / 200) = (10/3) * L1

Now, we need to find the value of L1. We can use the first scenario to find it:

I1 = V1 / R1

200 milliamps = 60 volts / R1

R1 = 60 / 0.2

R1 = 300 ohms

Now, we can find L1 using the relationship between resistance and length:

R1 = k * L1

300 = k * L1

L1 = 300 / k

Now, since we don't know the specific value of k, let's use a variable "x" to represent it:

L1 = 300 / x

Now, go back to the equation for (I2 / I1):

(I2 / 200) = (10/3) * L1

(I2 / 200) = (10/3) * (300 / x)

Now, plug in the value of x:

(I2 / 200) = (10/3) * (300 / k)

Now, let's solve for I2:

I2 = (200 * 10 * 300) / (3 * k)

I2 = (2000 * 300) / (3 * k)

I2 = 200000 / k

Now, we need to find k. To do this, we can use the information from the first scenario:

I1 = V1 / R1

200 milliamps = 60 volts / 300 ohms

Now, calculate k:

k = 60 / 0.2

k = 300

Now, substitute k back into the equation for I2:

I2 = 200000 / k

I2 = 200000 / 300

I2 ≈ 666.67 milliamps

So, if you cut the wire in half and pass 400 volts through it, you will measure approximately 666.67 milliamps of current.

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 Jul 31, 2023

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