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Find the non-zero value of c  for which there is exactly one positive value of  b for which there is one solution to the equation \(x^2 + \left(b + \frac 1b\right)x + c = 0\)

 Jun 1, 2019
edited by Guest  Jun 1, 2019
 #1
avatar+8852 
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There is only one solution for  x  when the discrimant is  0 , that is, when...

 

\((b+\frac1b)^2-4(1)(c)\ =\ 0\\~\\ (b+\frac1b)^2-4c\ =\ 0\\~\\ (b+\frac1b)(b+\frac1b)-4c\ =\ 0\\~\\ b^2+2+\frac{1}{b^2}-4c\ =\ 0\\~\\ b^2+(2-4c)+\frac{1}{b^2}\ =\ 0\\~\\ b^4+(2-4c)b^2+1\ =\ 0\qquad\text{Let}\qquad u=b^2\\~\\ u^2+(2-4c)u+1\ =\ 0\)

 

There is only one solution for  u, and thus only one positive value of  b ,  when...

 

\((2-4c)^2-4\ =\ 0\\~\\ (2-4c)^2\ =\ 4\\~\\ 2-4c\ =\ 2\qquad\text{or}\qquad2-4c\ =\ -2\\~\\ c\ =\ 0\phantom{2-4}\qquad\text{or}\qquad c\ =\ 1\)

 

The non-zero value of  c  is  1 .

 

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To check this answer, let's find the values of  b  for which   \(x^2+(b+\frac1b)x+1=0\)   has only one solution.

 

\(x^2+(b+\frac1b)x+1=0\)     has only one solution when....

 

\((b+\frac1b)^2-4\ =\ 0\\~\\ b^2-2+\frac{1}{b^2}\ =\ 0\\~\\ b^4-2b^2+1\ =\ 0\\~\\ (b^2-1)^2\ =\ 0\\~\\ b\ =\ \pm1\)

 

There is only one positive value of  b  for which there is one solution to the equation  \(x^2+(b+\frac1b)x+1=0\)

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 Jun 1, 2019
 #2
avatar+7763 
0

The exact same question has been asked here before.

 

https://web2.0calc.com/questions/help_77926

 Jun 1, 2019

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