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what is 6^2/2(3)+4

 Aug 3, 2017
 #1
avatar+8079 
0

what is 6^2/2(3)+4

 

Power calculation before point calculation before line calculation,
then from left to right.

 

\(\frac{6^2}{2\times 3}+4=\frac{36}{6}+4=6+4\color{blue}=10\)

 

Whoever wants can also shorten de Bruch by 6.    (\(\frac{36}{6}=\frac{6}{1}\) )

 

laugh  !

 Aug 3, 2017
 #2
avatar+2340 
+1

This is a rare example in mathematics where, I believe, parentheses is necessary in order to evaluate the expression without ambiguity. I will demonstrate why.

 

Strictly speaking, asinus's interpretation is incorrect. If you were to evaluate this with a calculator inputted like as is, the calculator would evaluate it as \(\frac{6^2}{2}*3+4\). This is because the 2(3) is really multiplication, so division takes precedence since it is comes first in the expression. First it does 6^2, then it divides 6^2 by 2 because division is first from left to right, and then it multiplies that quantity by 3. Here is another example with a variable 

 

8/2y

 

Using the same logic as above, this equation, in fraction form is strictly \(\frac{8}{2}y\)--not \(\frac{8}{2y}\). Some would argue, however, that 2y is a term, so it shouldn't be separated.  

 

How do we eliminate this ambiguity if there is no fraction button to speak of? Use parentheses! 

 

Asinus's interpretation of \(\frac{6^2}{2*3}+4\) will be unambiguous once you add 1 set of parentheses with \(6^2/(2(3))+4\). Now, the only correct interpretation is \(\frac{6^2}{2*3}+4\) because the parentheses indicate that we are dividing by the quantity of the product of 2 and 3.

 

The strict interpretation is \(\frac{6^2}{2}*3+4\) should be written like \((6^2/2)(3)+4\). In this case, the quantity of six squared divided by two is all multiplied by three. No more ambiguity.

 

Okay, after all of this ranting, now I will evaluate what I believe to be, under the current rules of the order of operations, the way to evaluate the expression 6^2/2(3)+4 as \(\frac{6^2}{2}*3+4\):

 

\(\frac{6^2}{2}*3+4\) Evaluate the numerator. \(6^2=36\)
\(\frac{36}{2}*3+4\) Simplify the fraction by recognizing that the 36 is divisible by 2 because 36 is even.
\(18*3+4\) Do multiplication before addition.
\(54+4\)  
\(58\)  
   

 

 

 

                    
 

 Aug 3, 2017
 #3
avatar+8079 
0

Hello  \(X^2\)

Neither of us is wrong.
Right, who puts brackets to represent the meaning of his term.
greetings :)

asinus  Aug 4, 2017
 #4
avatar+2340 
0

Greetings to you, too :)

TheXSquaredFactor  Aug 5, 2017

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