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A horse-drawn carriage tour company has found that the number of people that take their tour depends on the price charged per customer. The more the company charges for a tour, the fewer people decide to take the tour.

 

The function c(x)=50+5x represents price charged per customer where x is the number of $5 increases they charge at a rate of $50 per person. 

The function p(x)=80−2x represents the number of customers expected for the day, where x is the number of $5 increases they charge at a rate of $50 per person.

 

What does (p⋅c)(2) mean about the horse-drawn carriage tour company?

 

  • The horse-drawn carriage tour company can expect to take in $4560 when the charge per customer is $40.

  • The horse-drawn carriage tour company can expect to take in $4960 when the charge per customer is $60.

  • The horse-drawn carriage tour company can expect to take in $4560 when the charge per customer is $60.

  • The horse-drawn carriage tour company can expect to take in $4960 when the charge per customer is $40.

My answer=C Am I right?

Guest Mar 22, 2018

Best Answer 

 #1
avatar+2143 
+1

The definitions are given clearly to us; now, we must interpret the information.

 

"The function c(x)=50+5x represents price charged per customer where x is the number of $5 increases they charge at a rate of $50 per person. "

 

This segment states that a particular function \(c(x)=50+5x\) determines the cost for one attendee for this horse-drawn carriage tour company.

 

"The function p(x)=80−2x represents the number of customers expected for the day, where x is the number of $5 increases they charge at a rate of $50 per person."

 

\(p(x)=80−2x\) is a function that determines the number of attendees for this event. 

 

\((p*c)(2)=p(2)*c(2)\), therefore, determines the total cost of the fee for all attendees when two five-dollar increments are placed on the cost.

 

\(\textcolor{red}{p(2)}*\textcolor{blue}{c(2)}\) I decided to use colors to help differentiate the two quantities.
\(\textcolor{red}{p(2)=80-2*2}\) Determine the number of attendees when two five-dollar increments are placed on the cost.
\(\textcolor{red}{p(2)=76}\)  
\(\textcolor{blue}{c(2)=50+5*2}\) Evaluate.
\(\textcolor{blue}{c(2)=60}\)  
\(\textcolor{red}{p(2)}*\textcolor{blue}{c(2)}\\ \textcolor{red}{76}\hspace{4mm}*\textcolor{blue}{60}\)  
\($4560\)  
   

 

Knowing this information, I would agree with you! The answer is C!

TheXSquaredFactor  Mar 22, 2018
 #1
avatar+2143 
+1
Best Answer

The definitions are given clearly to us; now, we must interpret the information.

 

"The function c(x)=50+5x represents price charged per customer where x is the number of $5 increases they charge at a rate of $50 per person. "

 

This segment states that a particular function \(c(x)=50+5x\) determines the cost for one attendee for this horse-drawn carriage tour company.

 

"The function p(x)=80−2x represents the number of customers expected for the day, where x is the number of $5 increases they charge at a rate of $50 per person."

 

\(p(x)=80−2x\) is a function that determines the number of attendees for this event. 

 

\((p*c)(2)=p(2)*c(2)\), therefore, determines the total cost of the fee for all attendees when two five-dollar increments are placed on the cost.

 

\(\textcolor{red}{p(2)}*\textcolor{blue}{c(2)}\) I decided to use colors to help differentiate the two quantities.
\(\textcolor{red}{p(2)=80-2*2}\) Determine the number of attendees when two five-dollar increments are placed on the cost.
\(\textcolor{red}{p(2)=76}\)  
\(\textcolor{blue}{c(2)=50+5*2}\) Evaluate.
\(\textcolor{blue}{c(2)=60}\)  
\(\textcolor{red}{p(2)}*\textcolor{blue}{c(2)}\\ \textcolor{red}{76}\hspace{4mm}*\textcolor{blue}{60}\)  
\($4560\)  
   

 

Knowing this information, I would agree with you! The answer is C!

TheXSquaredFactor  Mar 22, 2018

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