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avatar+1832 

If two vectors are skew parallel they dont have point of intersect.  

But we can find the angle between the two vectors by using the dot product  

How this coming?   

difficulty advanced
xvxvxv  Apr 10, 2015

Best Answer 

 #5
avatar+890 
+5

I think that it's likely that what's being referred to in this question are lines in space rather than vectors.

I'm picturing two non-coincident parallel lines with a third line passing through and at right angles to each one of them. Using the third line as an axis, one of the lines is rotated through some angle and the object of the exercise is to find that angle.

Bertie  Apr 12, 2015
 #1
avatar+93683 
+5

Hi 315,

I know almost nothing about vectors so I am hoping to learn from your question too.

If two vectors are skew then that means that they are not coplanar.

It seems to me that if the vectors are parallel then they have to be coplanar.  

So, what are skew parallel vectors?

Melody  Apr 11, 2015
 #2
avatar+1832 
+5

Thank you Melody to richness my topic.  

xvxvxv  Apr 11, 2015
 #3
avatar+1832 
0

Any one? 

xvxvxv  Apr 11, 2015
 #4
avatar+27056 
+5

Vectors are either skew (in 3-d) or parallel or they intersect.  If they are parallel they are at an angle of zero relative to each other.  If they intersect you can find the angle using the dot product.

 

I don't know what it means to find the angle between skew vectors.  In general you would need to project them onto the same plane to find an angle, and this could be different depending on which plane you project onto. However, my knowledge of skew vectors is limited so perhaps I'm wrong.

Alan  Apr 12, 2015
 #5
avatar+890 
+5
Best Answer

I think that it's likely that what's being referred to in this question are lines in space rather than vectors.

I'm picturing two non-coincident parallel lines with a third line passing through and at right angles to each one of them. Using the third line as an axis, one of the lines is rotated through some angle and the object of the exercise is to find that angle.

Bertie  Apr 12, 2015
 #6
avatar+93683 
0

Thanks Alan and Bertie :)

Melody  Apr 12, 2015

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